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May 2005

Sunday, May 1 2005

Nowshera is a small town and cantonment near the Peshawar District of the North West Frontier Province. It is situated on the right bank of the Kabul river 27 miles east of Peshawar. The population of this small town was 9,518 (1901 census). It is a place which acts as a junction for the frontier railway that runs to the station of Mardan and continues to Dargai and Malakand on the route to Chitral. . . . Read More

Sunday, May 1 2005

North Waziristan covers an area of 1,817 square miles. Both mahsuds, entirely in south waziristan and wazirs are derwesh khels. The north waziristan wazirs are utmanzai of which the major sections are wali khel, momit khel and ibrahim khel. Some 50,000 daurs constitute an important minor tribe of the agency and are said to be the original inhabitants. . . . Read More

Sunday, May 1 2005

Mohmand Agency is the most heavily populated Agency. According to the the 1998 census, its population stood at 3,92,000 with a fairly high density of 171 persons per square kilometre and extremely un-favourable land-man ratio. The agency was created in 1951 before which the Mohmand Tribes were administered by the Deputy Commissioner, Peshawar. Until 1973 the headquarters of the Mohmand agency were in Peshawar when they were moved to Ekkagund. . . . Read More

The Buddha of Swat, Noor Jehan Mecklai
Sunday, May 1 2005

In Mumbai, recently I bought an extremely charming Buddha, seated with several little children on a buffalo that plodded through the grassy country side. One might call it "Buddha Takes a Holiday", yet it reminds me of how the 24-year-old Dalai Lama, fleeing from Tibet and badly stricken with fever, finally crossed the Indian border on the back of a dzo, a creature half yak and half buffalo. . . . Read More

Sunday, May 1 2005

Malakand agency lies at a strategically important position as it acts as a Gateway to Swat, Dir, Chitral and Bajaur. It is in the lower Swat region amidst high mountains thick with evergreen olive and pine trees. It stands at the exit of a pass known as Malakand Pass or Darrah Malakand; now much less difficult to cross than before as one travels from Peshawar to Swat. . . . Read More

Sunday, May 1 2005

In the beginning, the name Mardan was given to a small area after the name of Pir Mardan Shah, a prominent religious figure. Gradually, a large surrounding area came to be known as Mardan. The area constituting Mardan district is part of Peshawar valley, which first appears in history as part of Gandhara Kingdom. Until 1937, Mardan district was a part of Peshawar district. In 1937, Mardan was set up as an independent district after the name of its headquarters town. . . . Read More