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March 2005

Peshawars Buddhist Past, Fidaullah Sehrai
Tuesday, March 29 2005

The name Peshawar is derived from the Sanskrit word Pushpapur meaning the City of Flowers. Fahiene, the first Chinese pilgrim called it Fi-leu-sha in AD400. Sungyun, the second pilgrim noticed it in AD520 at which time the king of Gandhara . . . Read More

Thursday, March 24 2005

"They hardly gave us time to collect our thoughts. Nobody believed a historical site of such significance could ever be demolished. We were given 24 hours to pack and leave!" sighed one of the distraught staff members who had spent his lifetime at the Dean's Hotel. . . . Read More

Tuesday, March 1 2005

Bannu is mainly an administrative headquarter and an army garrison. It is an important junction on the Peshawar Quetta road. It is surrounded by the Kohat district to the North, the Tochi Valleys of the North Waziristan Tribal agency to the west, and Lakki Marwat district to the south. Bannu lies in the north west corner of the disctrict in the valley of Kurram River. . . . Read More

Tuesday, March 1 2005

The history of Ziarat during the British colonial administration is the same as that of the Sibi district of which it was a part until 1986. The area came under British colonial influence by the middle of the last century, and was made a part of British India in 1887 like the rest of the old Sibi district. . . . Read More

Tuesday, March 1 2005

Stretching 700 m (1100km) along the border with Afghanistan, astride the Khyber Pass and other historical gateways to India from Persia and Central Asia and embracing some of Asia's most impenetrable mountains and intractable peoples is the North West Frontier Province. Here, Buddhism matured and was launched through the Karakoram into Asia. Some of history's most famous conquerors got their noses bloodied by fierce tribes. . . . Read More

Tuesday, March 1 2005

Takhte Sulaiman, the highest peak of Sulaiman range, is shrouded in myth and mystery. Named after the wise Jewish prophet Solomon or Sulaiman, the peak possesses a strange healing quality. The legend has it that the prophet while on his floating carpet was wont to stay on top of the Takht. . . . Read More

Tuesday, March 1 2005

The history of Swat valley up to the beginning of the present century is not very well known. The Bronze and Iron Ages finds show no continuous development but a shifting supremacy of various invading and local tribes. This may be due to the unsettled nature of the dominant groups of peoples caused by frequent invasions, upheavals and mass migrations. . . . Read More

Tuesday, March 1 2005

In the 1840s, tribal swat started to get organized with the rise of a sufi ascetic and anti british reformer named abdul ghafoor, who later became known as the akhund of swat. Akhund means theologian or religious teacher. When the british moved into Peshawar in 1849 he rallied the clans but his state collapsed after a few years. . . . Read More

Tuesday, March 1 2005

South Waziristan Agency has an area of 2,556 square miles. Three quarters of the population are Mahsud, the remaining quarter, Wazir. This division based on the traditional Nikkat (ancestral hereditaments) was confirmed by the British as the basis for all tribal dealings whether in terms of profit or loss, reward or punishment. . . . Read More

The Magic at Shandoor, Saifudin Ismail Ji
Tuesday, March 1 2005

In the first century BC when polo was invented in Central Asia, kings probably judged the skills of their horsemen by watching them battle with the opponent's team to wrest the "polo" - ball in the local language - from them. There was no limit to the number of players in each team. . . . Read More